American Indian sacred objects, skeletal remains, repatriation and reburial a resource guide, 1994 by Rayna Green

Cover of: American Indian sacred objects, skeletal remains, repatriation and reburial | Rayna Green

Published by American Indian Program, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Antiquities -- Bibliography,
  • Indians of North America -- Religion -- Bibliography

Edition Notes

Cover title

Book details

StatementRayna Green with John Barbry ... [et al.]
ContributionsBarbry, John
The Physical Object
Pagination60 p. ;
Number of Pages60
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17950822M

Download American Indian sacred objects, skeletal remains, repatriation and reburial

American Indian sacred objects, skeletal remains, repatriation and reburial: a resource guide, The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), passed inprovides a process for museums and federal agencies to return certain cultural items such as human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, etc.

to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organisations. Kennewick Man. The Kennewick Man is the name generally given to.

In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native communities and archaeologists.

In this unprecedented volume, Native Americans and non-Native Americans within and beyond the academic community offer their views on repatriation and the. Chris Raymond, "Reburial of Indian Remains Stimulates Studies, Friction Among Scholars," Chronicle of Higher Education, 3 OctoberA "Human Skeletal Remains-Preservation or Reburial?" Yearbook of Physical Anthropology The Repatriation of Native American Human Remains' and will not need an account to access the.

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), Pub.25 U.S.C. et seq., Stat.is a United States federal law enacted on 16 November The Act requires federal agencies and institutions that receive federal funding to return Native American "cultural items" to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian Enacted by: the st United States Congress.

Repatriation and Reburial Issues with Native American Ancestral Remains Repatriation is the return of human skeletal remains or sacred objects or objects of cultural significance to the individuals, groups, or nations that the archaeological finds belonged to.

“Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits uses the story of one museum to show how Native American symbols of identity and ceremony and ancestral bones were initially appropriated as objects of cultural patrimony, but recently have become repatriation and reburial book of a complicated struggle of ownership.

As Colwell profoundly shows, the emotional price paid by everyone. In the past decade the repatriation of Native American skeletal remains and funerary American Indian sacred objects has become a lightning rod for radically opposing views about cultural patrimony and the relationship between Native communities and archaeologists.

In the U.S., legislation such as the National Museum of the American Indian Act () and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA, ) has created a legal basis for Author: Christian Feest. American Indian Sacred Objects, Skeletal Remains, Repatriation and Reburial: A Resource Guide.

Washington, D.C.: American Indian Program, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, HBC Authoritative guide to the process of repatriation. Stanford Agrees to Return Ancient Bones to Indians digs at Indian burial grounds and museum collections of sacred objects.

3,Year-Old Remains. of. American Indian sacred objects, skeletal remains, repatriation and reburial: a resource guide. Washington (DC): The American Indian Program, National Museum of American History. Washington (DC): The American Indian Program, National Museum of American History.

Inthe American Association of Museums reported to the Senate Select Committee of Indian Affairs that museums h Native American skeletal remains.' The Smithsonian Institution alone American Indian and Alaskan native remains and thousands of burial artifacts. Indian activist Susan Shown Harjo explained that Indians are.

(see Rayna Green, compiler, American Indian Sacred Objects, Skeletal Remains, Repatriation and Reburial: A Resource Guide [Washington, D.C.: American 6 Chapter OneFile Size: 1MB.

Curation and Repatriation of Sacred and Tribal Objects ANDREW GULLIFORD FAR FROM THE SOURCES of many of its artifacts, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) on the upper west side of Manhattan con-tains over a million items, making it one of the largest collections of North American tribal objects in the world.

This demanded, among other things, the repatriation of culturally signifi cant Native American material (human remains, sacred objects, etc.) from federal agencies and institutions (Thomas Project, with Philip Spiess, Jennifer Vigil, Nancy Mithlo et al.

to produce and update definitive bibliographic resource: Native American Sacred Objects, Skeletal Remains, Repatriation and Reburial: A Resource Guide,  Sacred Objects and Sacred Places: Preserving Tribal Traditions. They seek to repatriate the many thousands of Indian skeletal remains and culturally significant Indian artifacts now held by museums across North America.

the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA, ), and President William Clinton's Executive Author: Christopher Vecsey. Inspired by a key session for the World Archaeological Congress in South Africa, The Dead and their Possessions is the first book to tackle the principle, policy and practice of repatriating museum artefacts, rather than cultural heritage in general.

Increasingly, indigenous people world-wide are asserting their fundamental right to determine the future of the human remains of their ancestors 5/5(1). The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act(NAGPRA), Pub.

25 U.S.C. et seq., Stat.is a United States federal law enacted on 16 November The Act requires federal agencies and institutions that receive federal funding [1] to return Native American “cultural items” to lineal descendants and. Senator John McCain (R.

Arizona) and Congressman Morris Udall (D. Arizona) have introduced almost identical legislation in each House of Congress, that, among other things, provides the ownership of skeletal remains, grave goods, and sacred objects is held by the tribes or the heir of the Native American, if one can be identified.

Part II provides the backdrop for the controversy, by describing how American Indian remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony ended up in non-native hands.

This section also describes the largely unsuccessful pre-NAGPRA demands for the repatriation of American Indian property by American Indians. provides detailed procedures and legal standards governing the repatriation of human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony and that provides for the specific repatriation and reburial matters and three are considered to be general repatriation laws.

of Indian remains violates an American Indian's. The act places conditions on the intentional excavation and removal of Native American human remains and sacred objects found on federal or tribal lands as well as the handling of remains in cases of inadvertent discovery.

It also requires the repatriation of such materials already held in collections controlled by federal agencies and museums. a mechanism for the return and reburial of Native American skeletal remains and sacred objects from museum and university collections across the United States.2 The United States has not been alone in its contentious relations with its indigenous inhabitants regarding the disposition of human skeletal by: 7.

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, signed into law inaims to protect Indigenous human remains, funerary objects, and sacred objects that have a "cultural affiliation" with "presently existing" Indian Tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations.

Forensic anthropology is the study of human remains in a legal and medical setting. While repatriation, the return of human remains, associated artefacts, and sacred objects to a native group is discussed globally, this chapter mainly focuses on the issues within the United : Douglas H.

Ubelaker, Haley Khosrowshahi, Haley Khosrowshahi. Valery Havard’s action was not unique: Sincewhen Pilgrims first plundered an Indian grave out of curiosity, Americans have habitually collected Native American remains as curios or objects of study.

That habit became federal policy in when the U.S. Surgeon General ordered military personnel to collect skulls from battlefields, cemeteries, hospitals, and : American Anthropological Association.

NAGPRA (Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act of ) was seen as human rights legislation because it gave equal protection to Indian graves and sacred objects as given to other U.S. citizens' cemeteries and religious objects.

allows only federally recognized tribes to. “Plundered Skulls and Stolen Spirits uses the story of one museum to show how Native American symbols of identity and ceremony and ancestral bones were initially appropriated as objects of cultural patrimony, but recently have become part of a complicated struggle of Colwell profoundly shows, the emotional price paid by everyone involved—Native American, archaeologist, and /5(18).

This book offers his personal account of the process of repatriation, following the trail of four objects as they were created, collected, and ultimately returned to their sources: a sculpture that is a living god, the scalp of a massacre victim, a ceremonial blanket, and a skeleton from a Author: Mitra Sharafi.

History of American Indians. STUDY. PLAY. Major Eugene Baker. Baker Massacre, set out after 2 week period from Fort Shaw to look for Mountain Chief's Piegan Band who he thought was harboring the murderers, attacked the wrong camp on the Maria's river (Heavy Runner's camp) Mountain Chief.

Smithsonian Museum of Natural History summaries on repatriation: / 3/6: Sacred objects, skeletal remains repatriation and reburial resource guide, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History: 3/7: Repatriation of Indian artifacts at Colorado Historical Society, article: 3/8.

With the help of the Native American Rights Fund, their victory set the stage for the larger movement that resulted in the enactment of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).

Last year I wrote about attending the reburial of some of the Pawnee skeletal remains and funerary objects that were repatriated to them. This book offers his personal account of the process of repatriation, following the trail of four objects as they were created, collected, and ultimately returned to their sources: a sculpture that is a living god, the scalp of a massacre victim, a ceremonial blanket, and a skeleton from a /5(18).

The Native American Graves and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), passed in the United States inrequired that museums and other research institutions determine and confirm the cultural affiliation of all Native American skeletal remains and associated funerary objects in their possession, provide the appropriate affiliated tribe with an.

The repatriation of American Indian human remains as well as the repatriation of funerary objects and other cultural objects, identified as “objects of patrimony”—i.e., something owned by the entire people— such as wampum belts, or sacred objects such as medicine bundles, is occurring today because of determined efforts by American.

This book offers his personal account of the process of repatriation, following the trail of four objects as they were created, collected, and ultimately returned to their sources: a sculpture that is a living god, the scalp of a massacre victim, a ceremonial blanket, and a skeleton from a.

Five papers on American Indian curriculum development, American Indians and their imprisonment, the challenge of American Indians to Anthropology, and American Indian repatriation and reburial issues.

"Hopi and Navajo: Cultures in Conflict," Native American Awareness Week, MaUniversity of Colorado, Boulder. Generally, a museum or Federal agency that has loaned human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony to another individual, museum, or Federal agency is considered to retain control of those human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural patrimony for purposes of these regulations [U.S.

Human Remains and Ethical Practice. Download BibTex Bibliography Print or Save to PDF. Tamaki Makau-Rau Accord on the Display of Human Remains and Sacred Objects () Book, Chapter, or Edited Volume.

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, Scientific Study, and Kennewick Man. Journal Article. The human remains are determined to be Native American based on the archeological context ” (Eventually the museum staff met with representatives of the AkChin Indian Community of the Maricopa Indian Reservation and other Native American tribes to determine repatriation of return of the bones and artifacts to a tribe or tribes.).

Sincethe U.S. Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act has required publicly funded agencies and institutions to return human remains held .

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